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Invasive Animals

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Invasive Animals 2016-12-13T10:35:58+00:00

Established Invasive Animals

The animals shown below are not native, but are well established on Salt Spring. Under the British Columbia Wildlife Act, a wildlife permit or license is not required to kill alien animals (all regulations regarding use of firearms still apply).

Black rat

Black Rat  Rattus rattus Introduced rats prey upon native birds and can cause considerable damage around buildings and gardens. Rat problems near dwellings can be minimized by tightly securing garbage and by avoiding the placement of

Brown rat

Brown rat The Brown Rat (also called the Norway rat) Rattus norvegicus is globally widespread and costs primary industry hundreds of millions of dollars per year. It has caused or contributed to the extinction or range

Coypu

The coypu resembles a rat but body length is up to 60 cm (2 feet). The tail is naked and round, unlike that of a beaver or muskrat (flattened). This aquatic South America native

Rabbits

Rabbits Eastern cottontails and domestic European rabbits have been released on Salt Spring. They can easily destroy native plants and gardens. European rabbits excavate extensive burrow systems that have resulted in considerable damage in the

Bullfrog

Bullfrog The bullfrog is a large brownish or greenish frog (up to eight inches) with a skin fold around the ear. Bullfrogs are invading Salt Spring Island, having escaped from frog farms in other communities

Brown Rat

Brown Rat Rattus norvegicus The Brown Rat or Norway Rat is introduced to BC. Photo by Jean-Jacques Boujot

Invasive Animals Watch List:

The following animals are potential invaders. Their spread can be curtailed through vigilance. Please watch for, and report the location of these species.

ll regulations regarding use of firearms still apply).

Virginia opossum

Virginia opossum This cat-sized animal has a long naked scaly tail. It was reported on southern Vancouver Island in 1992 and high numbers have been observed on Hornby Island, where it is a predator of

Eastern grey squirrel

This large grey or black tree squirrel was introduced to Vancouver Island in the1960s.and its range has been expanded by wildlife rehabilitation centers. It may pose a significant risk to Garry oak tree reproduction. To

Nuisance Animals:

Reduced predation and hunting pressure have allowed deer populations to increase on Salt Spring Island far above natural levels. A recent study in the Gulf Islands showed that deer have over-browsed native vegetation and reduced the diversity and abundance of birds.

Information on deer-proofing, fencing and living with deer:

Reduce Deer Damage in Your Yard

Dealing with Deer

Black-tailed deer

Black-tailed deer Reduced predation and hunting pressure have allowed deer populations to increase on Salt Spring Island far above natural levels. A recent study in the Gulf Islands showed that deer have over-browsed native vegetation