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Yuma Myotis

Myotis yumanensis  This common Salt Spring bat can appear similar to the Little Brown Myotis and the two species may occupy the same roosts. The Yuma bat is distinguished from the Little Brown Myotis by the higher call frequency of the former, and a preference for foraging

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Little Brown Bat

Myotis lucifugus This is a small bat about the length of a human finger and the weight of a large coin. It takes flight at dusk to feed upon a variety of insects that are captured on the wing. In summer, female bats give birth to a single

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Western Long-eared Myotis

Myotis evotis  This tiny bat has dark long ears and may have darkish shoulder patches. A fine fringe of hairs is present on the edge of the tail membrane. These bats roost under loose bark, in hollow trees, stumps, caves, and rock crevices, but rarely in bat

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California Myotis

Myotis californicus This tiny bat has moderately-sized ears that would extend beyond the nose if pushed forward. It has a keel on the calcar, the ankle spur that supports the airfoil membrane (see below). A single young is born in the summer months, (for example, a pregnant female

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Long-legged Myotis

Myotis volans  This large Myotis bat has belly fur extending as far as the knees and elbows. The ears are rounded and fairly short. The Long-legged Myotis is associated with coniferous forests, especially old growth. Roosts have been found in snags, live trees, crevices, steam banks, and

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Big Brown Bat

Eptesicus fuscus  This very large bat can weigh 2- 4 times that of our smaller bat species. Ears are black and the distinctively long fur is brownish and oily. The large strong jaws are suited to a diet that includes beetles, termites, and carpenter ants. Big Brown

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Silver-haired Bat

Lasionycteris noctivagans  This bat is recognizable by its white-tipped hairs and short round ears with blunt ear tragus. It is often solitary in behavior, roosting in snags and live trees and hibernating under tree bark or in wood piles. Habitat is primarily riparian areas, forests, and forest

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Hoary Bat

Lasiurus cinereu  The hoary bat is has a grizzled camouflage appearance including some yellowish fur. Unlike most bats, the tail membrane is furred, which provides insulation for this tree-roosting bat. The hoary bat is solitary; it does not congregate in maternal nursing colonies unlike many other BC

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Townsend’s Big-eared Bat

Corynorhinus townsendii Townsend’s bat is recognizable by its enormous ears and glandular bulbs between the eyes and nostrils. Like most bats, the big-eared bat has a low reproductive rate, the female giving birth to a single young annually that nurses for about six to eight weeks. The

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